Thinking of hiring a cultivation consultant? Here’s what you can expect.

By David Perkins

Hiring an experienced cultivation consultant is yet another cost, amongst the
laundry list of never-ending expenses in the set up of a regulated, recreational grow.
However, in the big picture it can actually save you a significant amount of time and
money by providing you with the information you need to formulate a realistic
budget, profitable cultivation site, and well-trained workforce. This article will
explore just some of the many benefits a cultivation consultant can provide to your
company.
An experienced consultant will have a vast array of knowledge to ensure the
success of your company. One important area they can advise you on is budgeting.
With years of experience cultivating, in both medical and recreational markets, an
experienced consultant will have knowledge of not only start-up costs, but also
hidden costs you must prepare for in advance. They will also be able to advise you
on strategies to avoid future costs and problems. There may also be expenses in the
build-out of your cultivation site you have not considered. For example, you may
need a wastewater treatment plan if you have any fertilizer runoff that will flow to
a sewage drain. It is important to know all possible costs when securing your
investment or planning out your budget for the year.
Set up of a large-scale cultivation site in a regulated market can be extremely
costly. Gone are the days of putting up a few lights in a closet; growing in a regulated
market requires a larger scale, and therefore, larger costs and more complications. A
consultant experienced in design and implementation of such large-scale, intricate
cultivation plans will provide you with the knowledge you need to properly set-up
and maintain your facility in order to ensure your company’s success. They will also
know the tips and tricks to save you money along the way.
A good consultant will be able to advise you on the design of your facility to
ensure that the layout supports productivity, and that there is a proper workflow. It
is important to hire a consultant before you get started with the build-out of your
facility, as it will be much more costly to have to correct mistakes in your design
later on down the road. An experienced consultant will implement superior facilities
layout and design to avoid future problems at the outset. Something as simple as a
centralized irrigation distribution zone can save you a lot of time and money.
Once you have created the proper space, cultivation planning is important to
avoid unnecessary problems from arising, which will ultimately delay profit. A well
thought out cultivation plan will help you plan for success. A consultant will know
what does and doesn’t work. For example, some equipment will run off an app on
your phone; while convenient, there are some that don’t perform well which could
end up costing the entire crop. These are things you want to know and work
around, before you spend money unnecessarily.
An experienced consultant will have previously worked in various types and
scales of cultivation sites, and from that experience will be able to teach you which processes and techniques work, and which ones don’t. Someone with less
experience may believe that watering plants by hand would be an easy method to
keep your garden irrigated, but it is actually the most time-consuming labor task
(and therefore extremely costly), while an automated watering system can be very
simple and cost-effective to install.
A skilled consultant can provide the necessary training for your employees. Let’s
face it, this is an entirely new industry, and therefore, most people applying for
entry-level jobs at a cultivation site are unskilled. However, the best path to success
when dealing with large-scale cannabis cultivation is to have skilled, happy
employees. Educating and properly training your employees is essential. It helps to
teach employees not only how to complete a task, but to help them understand why
they are doing a given task. This will give your staff the skills and confidence they
need to complete the task properly. Unskilled hands in your garden can make or
break the success of your cultivation.
Don’t make the mistakes others have made. Hiring a cultivation consultant
can help you to avoid problems before they occur. A professional consultant has
the knowledge required to: predict issues and problems before they occur, or
implement a solution when corrective measures are necessary. Oftentimes issues
can be avoided just by knowing the cause and effect of decisions and the potential
outcomes they will have.
A cultivation consultant should also have a wide network of professional
contacts to help you address any issues or problems that arise. Having a network of
professionals to employ when necessary is critical for ensuring the success of every
project. For example, wholesale contacts for cultivation equipment can help you not
only to get the best price, but also ensure you are using the best equipment possible
for your situation.
If you are still unsure about whether or not you need a cultivation consultant
to help plan out your grow, or fix your grow if you’ve encountered problems, feel
free to contact me to discuss your needs. I assure you there are ways I can save you money, improve your yields, and help your company be more successful in this ever-
changing market.

To read previous articles by David Perkins click here

David Perkins is a Cultivation manger and consultant with over 20 years of experience
in the grow room. From build out to cultivation, cloning to processing, he has done it
all. David can help you succeed in the grow room, and likely save you money along the
way. If you are considering hiring a consultant, please reach out, and discuss with
David the ways in which he can help you achieve your goals. You can reach David at
(530)277-5891 or marleybrutusdave@gmail.com

Five Factors to Keep in Mind When Entering the Regulated Market

by David Perkins

It’s a different world growing cannabis in California; in fact it’s a completely different experience than it was even four years ago. It can be overwhelming to begin the process, which is where an experienced cultivation consultant can help. This article will highlight 5 factors to keep in mind before you begin growing in California’s regulated recreational market. 

Start Up – Costs, needs, and endless variables 

So you’ve decided to begin a recreational grow, here are the factors to consider before you get started. 

Permitting, the necessary precursor to cultivation, can be time- consuming, extremely expensive, and overwhelming. General experience dictates that any grow will take longer than planned and cost way more money than you ever expected or anticipated. Always account for more money and time than you think you need. Working with an experienced consultant can help you plan and account for all the costs and variables you may not have considered, prior to beginning cultivation, in order to ensure your success. 

Equipment. When choosing what equipment to use, stick to reputable equipment manufacturers. Don’t just go with the latest high tech gear because you see it on Instagram being advertised by a big, fancy grow operation. Stick to what you know best. Do your homework and research the equipment as much as possible, prior to purchase. Use equipment that has been tested and well documented with success. Some questions to ask yourself: is this necessary? Is it cost efficient? Will it help me reach my goals? 

Grow your business slowly and naturally. Getting too big too quick will most likely expose inefficiencies in your operating plan, which will be further compounded when production increases. Don’t sink before you can swim and start out on a massive scale before you have perfected your process. 

Cultivation – It pays to design it right the first time 

Success begins in the grow room. Never forget that. A properly engineered cultivation plan can be the difference between 3 and 6 harvest per year. Again, it is imperative here to do your homework. A well thought out plan can make or break you, and that is where an experienced cultivation consultant can help. 

Set realistic expectations. Understand that growing boutique-style cannabis is very difficult on a large scale, consistently. Don’t expect to grow perfect cannabis every time – it is unrealistic and can ultimately lead to failure if your financial model depends on it. Growing a plant, while mostly in your control, involves too many variables to rely on a perfect outcome round after round. You can do everything in your power, yet something unexpected can still happen and be detrimental to your yield, and therefore your profit. You must expect and plan for this. 

Automating as much of your grow as possible is always a good idea. This will greatly reduce labor costs and more importantly, minimize human error. In some instances, it will even allow you to review data and information remotely, in real-time, allowing you to ensure your cultivation site is always running as efficiently as possible, even when you aren’t there. 

Processing – Don’t skimp on the process 

If you are going to be harvesting cannabis for flower, it is imperative to have a properly built facility for drying, curing and storing your product. You must consider that this building will need to be large enough to house and properly store all of your harvest at once. This can make or break your crop at harvest time. If you don’t have the capacity to handle your harvest properly, it can lead to disastrous issues such as mold or too quick of a cure – conditions which make your cannabis unsellable in the regulated market. 

Although costly, if done correctly, you can also design this area to serve as your propagation, trimming, and breeding areas, which will ultimately save on costs in the long run. 

Also keep in mind, hand-trimmed cannabis will always look more appealing to the consumer than machine trimmed cannabis. However, hand trimming can be time-consuming, labor-intensive, and therefore far more costly than machine trimming. These are factors you will need to consider and budget for when deciding how to 

proceed. If you use a machine, you may save money upfront, but will you be able to sell your cannabis at full price? 

Distribution – Have a plan 

It is a good idea to have a plan for distribution, prior to startup. If you have an agreement with a retail outlet (or contract with a distributor), in writing, you will protect yourself from financial failure. Cannabis will never grow more valuable over time, therefore, you want to have a plan in place for distribution, as soon as the cannabis is harvested and processed. Just as was the case in the black market days, you never want to hold on to your cannabis for long periods of time. 

Do not distribute without agreements in writing! While some oral agreements may be enforceable, it will be extremely costly to litigate. Therefore, you should plan to hire a lawyer beforehand to create fail-proof agreements that will hold up in court, should a distributor not pay you for your product. 

Sales – Build your brand, but be realistic 

Building your brand is important. And if you don’t produce your own high-quality flower you cannot expect to have a product up to your standards. Your brand will not be successful if you cannot consistently provide consumers with high-quality cannabis. Relying on other growers to produce your cannabis for you is risky to your brand. Even if you are a manufacturer, you may not be able to rely on other suppliers to maintain the quality volume you need in order to manufacture your products consistently. 

The regulated market in California is new. Therefore your must necessarily account for a great degree of price fluctuations in the market. When creating your budget at the outset, you must account for fluctuations in profit. Knowing when prices are going to be at their lowest can help you avoid having an oversupply of inventory. It can also help you avoid such situations by planning your cultivation/harvest accordingly. 

There are both consumer and government influenced market trends that can affect your bottom line. Therefore, these must be accounted for at the outset. 

On the consumer level, you must know what people are buying and how they are consuming. And these factors can change quickly with the introduction of new technology, methods, or new devices intended for cannabis consumption. You must stay on top of these trends. The government regulations can also affect these trends. Products used for cultivation can become banned i.e. products you once relied on in your cultivation can be found to have contaminants known to cause test failures, even in “approved products.” 

Ultimately, all of these factors can make or break your success, and therefore, must be considered, researched, and accounted for prior to beginning your cultivation in the regulated market. Working with a consultant with over 20 years of grow experience, and more importantly, extensive experience in large scale cultivation in the regulated market, can help you achieve the success you desire. Cultivation in the regulated market is costly, but working with a consultant can help you cut costs at the outset, and save you from unexpected expenses in the long run.

David Perkins is a Cultivation manger and consultant with over 20 years of experience in the grow room. From build out to cultivation, cloning to processing, he has done it all. David can help you succeed in the grow room, and likely save you money along the way. If you are considering hiring a consultant, please reach out, and discuss with David the ways in which he can help you achieve your goals. You can reach David at (530)277-5891 or marleybrutusdave@gmail.com 

The Launch of Agora C Business Services

Agora C Business Services exists to solve the critical issues facing cannabis operators, both large and small. Their unique approach is not only what differentiates them, but also what makes them successful. They provide a broad range of services and solutions to help “grey market” cannabis operations transition into the regulated market, achieve their vision and optimize performance and productivity.

Agora C Business Services is the culmination of a restructuring of the Law Office of Dale Schafer, in order to lower the legal fees associated with entering or transitioning to the regulated cannabis market and service more cannabis operators in CA. By contracting with Agora C Business services, I can lower the cost for 3/4 of the necessary work required to obtain “Local Authorization” and a state license for CA cannabis businesses. I can also help operators to formulate good teams and train those teams in all areas necessary to adequately run a cannabis corporation, thereby helping those businesses to be as sustainable as possible.

I would encourage anyone seeking to enter or transition into California’s regulated cannabis market to visit the Agora C Business Services website and subscribe for all upcoming events and information on the opening of the El Dorado County Resource Center.

https://www.agoracbusinessservices.com/

El Dorado County – Seven Ad Hoc Cannabis Meetings Announced

Seven Ad Hoc Cannabis Meetings Announced

Seven Ad Hoc Cannabis Meetings Announced

Department:
CAO
Date:
3/5/2018
Contact:
Carla Hass
Phone:
(530) 621-4609

(PLACERVILLE, CA) – The following seven meetings of the El Dorado County ad hoc Cannabis Committee meeting are scheduled between today and May 14th.

WHAT: Ad hoc Cannabis Committee meetings

WHEN: All meetings are from 3:00 pm-5:00 pm

  • Monday, March 5th (Outdoor/Cottage)
  • Monday, March 12th (Indoor/Mixed Light/Cottage)
  • Monday, March 19th (Dispensaries/Deliveries/Distribution)
  • Monday, April 23rd (Microbusiness/Nurseries/Testing)
  • Monday, April 30th (Manufacturing)
  • Monday, May 7th (Tax Rates/Funding)
  • Monday, May 14th (Administering a Program/What does it look like?)

WHERE: All meetings will take place at the County Board of Supervisors Chambers 330 Fair Lane Placerville, CA

WHO: Members of the ad hoc Cannabis Committee, Supervisors Michael Ranalli and Sue Novasel
El Dorado County Staff
Members of the public are invited to attend

UPDATE – Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program

Cannabis Regulations

Workshop Overview

 

  1. Regulations Overview and Local Approval (Approx 3 hours)
  2. Temp. License Application Process – Includes information about all required elements of the temporary license application for the BCC, CDFA and/or CDPH (Approx 3 hours)
  3. Annual License Application 1 – Business Plan & Description, Business Formulation Documents, Fictitious Business Name Process (Approx 3 hours)
  4. Annual License Application 2 – Lists of Funds, Lists of Loans, Lists of Investments, Lists of Gifts, List of every individual with financial interest (approx 3 hours)
  5. Annual License Application 3 – List of every owner, Livescans, Evidence of Legal Right To Occupy, Evidence of Premises Compliance, Labor Peace Agreement (Approx 3 hours)
  6. Annual License Application 4 – Seller’s Permit, Proof of Bond, Standard Operating Procedures (Approx 3 hours)
  7. Annual License Application 5 – Cultivation Plan, Water Board Regs, Prohibited chemicals, heavy metals, etc. (Approx 3 hours)
  8. Annual License Application 6 – Track & Trace, Supply Chain, (Approx 3 hours)
  9. Maintaining Your License – Liability Issues, Potential hurdles, What to watch out for, Maintaining your License. (Approx 3 hours)
  10. Having a successful business – Your website, marketing your business, setting yourself apart in the industry, Branding, Trademarking (Approx 3 hours)

 

*** Between Workshops 2 & 3 there will be a week off to complete your TEMPORARY STATE APPLICATION and sit down with us to review before submitting

OR

Bank that 2-hour appointment for when you are ready to do so

AFTER WORKSHOP 10 THERE WILL BE ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO HAVE A 2-HOUR APPOINTMENT TO REVIEW YOUR ANNUAL APPLICATION 

OR

BANK THAT APPOINTMENT AS WELL

*** Program subject to change based on changes made by the State regulatory agencies

For more information go to Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program

6 Ways to Beat a Local Cannabis Ban

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED ON LEAFLY.COM

When California’s first adult-use cannabis stores opened on Jan. 1, many of the state’s residents realized they would be shut out. They weren’t happy. Residents of Orange County, where all but one city, Santa Ana, has banned retail sales, shook their heads in disgust. “Orange County will have no retail stores?” one Leafly reader wrote. “What a f joke OC is.”

If cannabis is legal statewide, how come you can’t buy it in your own county?

It’s not just Newport Beach turning its nose up. Retail cannabis may be legal statewide, but California law allows local municipalities to severely limit or ban cannabis companies. Cannabis is banned entirely, for example, in the cities of Redding, Pomona, Crescent City, and Santa Monica, as well as most of Orange, San Bernardino, and Ventura counties. That’s just the start of a long list.

These local bans aren’t entirely unusual—and they usually don’t last forever. During the early days of legalization in Colorado and Washington, many municipal councils enacted bans out of fear and ignorance. Suburban towns shut out retail storefronts, for example, nervous that legal sales could bring more trouble than good. Meanwhile, most local politicians voting on those bans knew very little about cannabis and the legal industry around it. Many bought into old stereotypes about weed, stoners, dealers, and crime.

When Oregon legalized, we saw the same thing. Today, California and Massachusetts are in the thick of it.

Here’s the rub: Many of the communities that initially enacted bans were themselves not anti-cannabis. Some voted overwhelmingly in favor of statewide legalization. In many cases, bans were the response to the vocal outcry of a relatively small number of concerned citizens. In others, local governments were simply unfamiliar with legal cannabis or felt unprepared to appropriately regulate it.

The good news is that bans can be reversed. But they don’t overturn themselves. Here are a few ways you can start opening minds and changing votes.

1. Work With an Advocacy Group (but Not Always)

You don’t need to reinvent the wheel. Connect with an advocacy organization, such as your state chapter of NORML, the National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws. They have a deep well of knowledge, resources, and experience with the local political landscape. The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) also has a “Block the Ban” initiative up and running; they’ve already successfully overturned the ban in one Massachusetts town.

Connecting with and joining NORML or another group doesn’t mean you become their official representative. Politicians sometimes tune out advocacy groups because they see them as “special interests.” That’s not entirely fair, but it is what it is. If you introduce yourself to a local elected official as a constituent and concerned citizen—or a concerned parent or business owner—you may get more traction.

2. Get Out and Meet the Man

It’s easy to protest The Man and his cannabis ban. But there is no Man. In most cases, there are well-meaning but fallible men and women who haven’t encountered a local constituent eager to talk with them as a cool-headed legalization advocate. (Okay, not all politicians are well-meaning. But you’d be surprised.) There are a number of entry points:

  • Sidle up to your local city council member before or after a weekly council meeting. Introduce yourself, give them your elevator pitch, and tell them you’d like to talk with them further about the issue.
  • Use the New Business or public comment period at the end of the council meeting to air your concern.
  • Write a letter to one or all of the council members.
  • Send a version of that letter to the local newspaper. Call out supporters and opponents of the ban by name.
  • Post about the issue on social media. Again, call out officeholders by name, and consider tagging them or creating a hashtag. You will get their attention.

Before you go: Have your clear, concise talking points ready to deliver. See #3 below.

3. Arm Yourself With Facts

“One of the biggest challenges we as a legislative body are going to face,” Indiana state Rep. Jim Lucas, a medical marijuana legalization supporter, recently told his colleagues, “is coming through all the smoke, all the fear-mongering, all the stigma, the ignorance.”

Luckily, there’s a lot of good evidence that a legal, regulated market works far better for everyone than prohibition.

There’s no shortage of misinformation when it comes to cannabis. Like with a lot of issues that people feel strongly about, it’s common for opportunists to seize on information that supports their preconceptions rather than digging deeper into the issues. Luckily, there’s a lot of good evidence that a legal, regulated market works far better for everyone than prohibition. So when you engage with elected officials, come armed with facts.

The reasons you support legal cannabis might not be reasons your neighbors or your council members find persuasive. If you’re talking to an elected official, learn about the issues that drive them customize your pitch. If you’re talking to a liberal Democrat, lead with social justice concerns. A conservative Republican may be more amenable to a pitch about personal freedom and the waste of taxpayer resources on nonsensical cannabis arrests. Centrists might appreciate the extra revenue to shore up budget holes. This article has a number of further tips.

4. Bring a Positive Proposal to the Table

Guess who writes a lot of the first drafts of legislation? Not the office holder! Seriously. Do some research. Find copies of the local cannabis ordinances adopted by towns and counties similar in size and culture to your own. Present the entire piece of legislation to your local office holder. They are busy, and they’re working on issues ranging from potholes to violent crime. The more work you can do for them, the more likely they’ll seriously consider introducing your measure.

5. Argue From a Position of Strength

Did your county, district, or town vote in favor of statewide cannabis legalization? Well then why is the local town council disrespecting the clearly expressed will of local voters? Do they think the voters are confused children?

70% of Marin County, CA, voters embraced legalization. And yet the county council banned it. That’s got to change.

When you approach an elected official, do so with the knowledge of how your district voted on the state’s ballot initiative. (If you’re working in a county that voted overwhelmingly against legalization, you will want to have an answer to the inevitable question. Often that’s where the experience of people from NORML and other groups comes in handy.)

For example, the map below shows how California counties voted on Proposition 64, the 2016 statewide measure to legalize the adult use of cannabis. Check out Marin County in the map below. Marin embraced legalization with 70% of the vote. Three months later the Marin County Board of Supervisors banned all cannabis-related business activity in unincorporated Marin. There’s your conversation starter, Concerned Marin Constituent.

6. Run Your Own “Beat the Ban” Initiative

When local elected officials won’t listen to your well-reasoned argument, you still have Option B: The local initiative. Find out how to get a local initiative on the ballot in your area, if it’s an option (different jurisdictions often have different rules). Reach out to groups like NORML and the Marijuana Policy Project, which have a lot of experience running and winning these “Beat the Ban” measures.

Local voters love to cast their ballots in favor of these initiatives, because they’re kind of like telling local politicians: “Yes, I did actually mean it when I voted for statewide legalization. It wasn’t a mistake.”

Often it’s just a matter of persistence. In Oregon, roughly a year after legal sales began, 15 municipalities that initially prohibited cannabis businesses voted to undo those bans. And in Massachusetts, which is readying for adult-use sales to begin this summer, a growing number of communities are voting to allow cannabis businesses, bucking an early trend of local bans.

“We got a lot of support from people who don’t use cannabis, but might want to someday,” Scott Winters, an Amesbury resident who spearheaded opposition to an anti-cannabis referendum that was defeated in November by a nearly 2-1 margin, told the Associated Press. “From users to non-users to just folks who want revenue for the city, we had a lot of support.

Bruce Barcott & Ben Adlin

Bruce Barcott is Leafly’s deputy editor. He is a Guggenheim Fellow and author of Weed the People: The Future of Legal Marijuana in America. Ben Adlin is an editor at Leafly who specializes in politics and the law. Together with editor Dave Schmader, they host Leafly’s weekly politics podcast, The Roll-Up.

Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program

Announcement

The purpose of this announcement is to gauge the interest in the DIY Program. The DIY Program is still being created and some of the elements of the program may change. The intent is to offer the DIY Program in Northern California (In the Sacramento Area), between March and May, and Southern California (Location TBD), between June and August, for approved participants.

 

Attorney Dale Schafer is a pioneer in the cannabis industry, practicing attorney of more than 30 years and expert on the california cannabis regulations. Since 1999 Mr Schafer has been working hard to help small cannabis business owners to follow california state law and bridge the gap between medical cannabis businesses and policy makers in local municipalities. As California moves into a regulated and legal market, Mr. Schafer is focused on helping small cannabis businesses to be successful and sustainable, not only in the application process but also in their first years of official business.

 

The average consultant/attorney charges approximately $25,000, per license, to complete the necessary paperwork to obtain the temporary and annual state cannabis license. That fee does not include the necessary education to be successful and sustainable, in the california cannabis industry, over the next 5+ years. It is the objective, of the Law Office of Dale Schafer, to participate in training and educating cannabis business owners to not only complete their paperwork but also to understand the landscape, of the up and coming cannabis industry, so as to be as successful as possible. It was with this objective, in mind, that we created the Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program and set the fee at approximately ¼ of that $25,000 cost.

 

The Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program is a pilot program, offered by the Law Office of Dale Schafer, to help cannabis business owners, who would only be prohibited by the cost of hiring an attorney to handle their paperwork needs in order to successfully open a legal state cannabis business within California. The program has been created to walk the applicant through the entire temporary and annual application process as well as many issues, the applicant will face, within the first year of business. The applicant will receive a 3-ring binder with resources to help with your application and business set-up process, sections and notes for each workshop, as well as section for the applicant’s business plan and standard operating procedures.

 

The objective, of the Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program is to help cannabis business owners, struggling to come up with all of the funds to obtain and maintain their temporary and annual state license, obtain all of the necessary tools to be as successful as possible in their application process as well as within their first year of business.

 

The goal, of the Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program is to offer each of the cannabis businesses, admitted into our program, all of the necessary one-on-one appointments, workshops, physical and online resources, etc. to obtain their temporary and annual license as well as maintain their license through the first year of business.

 

Who Will Benefit From The Program:

  • California cannabis business owners looking to transition from a non-profit mutual benefit model to a state licensed, for-profit, cannabis business.
  • New cannabis business owners looking to open a legal, state licensed, cannabis business in the State of California.
  • Operations Managers and/or Compliance Officers for licensed cannabis businesses

 

Please Note:

  • Only 25 applicants will be admitted into the Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program per program phase
  • The first phase will begin in March of 2018
  • Each program phase will be 12 weeks in total
  • Each and every client, of The Law Office of Dale Schafer, is required to complete an initial consultation. The initial consultation is approximately 2 hours, in length, and is billed at a rate of $500. Should Mr. Schafer determine that you are a candidate for the Successful Cannabis Business DIY Program, the initial consultation fee will be applied to the $7,500 program fee and your initial consultation requirement will be checked off as completed.
  • The order of workshops and/or content discussed within the workshop is subject to change based upon changes made within the state regulatory systems, development within the industry and/or subject matter which is found to be beneficial to the applicant.

 

Applicant Requirements:

  1. Applicant must sign a contract and pay a $7,500 fee to begin the program.

 

  1. Applicant must participate in a consultation which will be approximately 2 hours in length. Discussed at the consultation will be the desired license(s) to obtain, any potential hurdles to obtaining said license(s) and a basic plan to obtaining and maintaining said license(s).

 

  1. Applicant must attend and participate in the required workshops as follows:
    1. Regulations Overview (Approx 3 hours)
    2. Temp. License Application Process – Includes information about all required elements of the temporary license application for the BCC, CDFA and/or CDPH (Approx 3 hours)
    3. Annual License Application 1 – Business Plan & Description, Business Formulation Documents, Fictitious Business Name Process (Approx 3 hours)
    4. Annual License Application 2 – Lists of Funds, Lists of Loans, Lists of Investments, Lists of Gifts, List of every individual with financial interest (approx 3 hours)
    5. Annual License Application 3 – List of every owner, Livescans, Evidence of Legal Right To Occupy, Evidence of Premises Compliance, Labor Peace Agreement (Approx 3 hours)
    6. Annual License Application 4 – Seller’s Permit, Proof of Bond, Standard Operating Procedures (Approx 3 hours)
    7. Annual License Application 5 – Cultivation Plan, Water Board Regs, Prohibited chemicals, heavy metals, etc. (Approx 3 hours)
    8. Annual License Application 6 – Track & Trace, Supply Chain, Local Authorization (Approx 3 hours)
    9. Maintaining Your License – Liability Issues, Potential hurdles, What to watch out for, Maintaining your License. (Approx 3 hours)
    10. Having a successful business – Your website, marketing your business, setting yourself apart in the industry (Approx 3 hours)

 

  1. Between workshop’s B & C there will be a required consultation appointment to review all of the client’s collected elements, of the Temporary License Application, and ensure that all of the elements are up to par and therefore is likely to be accepted and approved by the regulating agency. (NOTE – From the date the Temporary Application is submitted there is approximately 30 days to get approved by the regulating agency. From the date the Temporary Application is approved there is 120 days to get the Annual Application submitted and approved by the regulating agency.)

 

  1. After all workshops have been completed their will be a required exit appointment to review all of the client’s collected elements, of the Annual License Application, and ensure that all of the elements are up to par and therefore it is likely that the application will be accepted and approved by the regulating agency. All final questions will be answered and the client will be exited from the program.

 

To Qualify Client MUST: (No Exceptions)

  • Have completed their Initial Consultation before the 1st Workshop date.
  • Have signed their contact before the 1st workshop date.
  • Have paid their program fee before the 1st workshop date.
  • Be willing and able to attend ALL workshop dates. Each date will cover a great amount of information essential to understanding exactly how to be successful in both submitting their application and running their business. However, we should consider allowing the main participant to list up to 2 alternate participants who could attend in their place should an emergency come up and the participant is unable to attend a workshop date.
  • Complete the entire program, including the exit appointment, within the allotted 12 week time period.

 

Program Timeline

  • First Workshop to begin in the 1st week of March
  • Workshops will run every Thursday from March – May:

Regulations Overview TBD

Temp. License Application Process TBD

Annual License Application 1 TBD

Annual License Application 2 TBD

Annual License Application 3 TBD

Annual License Application 4 TBD

Annual License Application 5 TBD

Annual License Application 6 TBD

Maintaining Your License TBD

Having a successful business TBD

*** You have approx. 2 weeks to complete your exit appointment and finish the program ***

 

What The Program Provides For The Applicant:

  • Approximately 30 hours of workshop time with Attorney Dale Schafer.
  • A 3-ring binder filled with cannabis business resources and workshop content.
  • One-on-one appointment to review both the Temporary Application and the Annual Application for the applicant’s cannabis license(s).
  • Access, via email and phone, to Attorney Dale Schafer’s staff, to answer questions, as the applicant completes their application process.

 

Application Process

To apply for the program click the link, below, and we will contact you once we are notified that your application has been received. If you have not heard from our office, within 2 business days, please email daleschaferlaw@gmail.com

https://form.jotform.com/80057095384157

What Is Really Required To File Your State Cannabis Application

My goal, today, is to dispel some of the fears and myths, around the State cannabis application process, and inform about the process of filing your application for a California State Cannabis Permit. Remember, this post does not pertain, specifically, to the local application as those can, and will, be different for the nearly 500 municipalities across California.

 

Temporary Application Requirements (Only Valid For 120 Days)

Temporary license application (can be filed by hard copy or via www.bcc.ca.gov)

The legal business name of the applicant

The email address of the applicant’s business and the telephone number for the premises

The business’ federal employer identification number

A description of the business organizational structure of the applicant (partnership or corporation)

The temporary license type that is being requested

The license designation requested, A-license or M-license, (all license types other than laboratories)

The contact information for the applicant’s designated primary contact person

owner’s name, title, percentage of ownership, mailing address, telephone number, & email address

The physical address of the premises to be licensed

Evidence that the applicant has the legal right to occupy and use the proposed location (section 5007)

A premises diagram

A copy of a valid license, permit, or other authorization issued by a local jurisdiction

Attestation to the following statement: Under penalty of perjury, I hereby declare that the information contained within and submitted with the application is complete, true, and accurate. I

understand that a misrepresentation of fact is cause for rejection of this application, denial of the license, or revocation of a license issued.

 

Cultivation Applications – Department Of Food And Agriculture

Temporary license applications shall be completed and submitted online at calcannabis.cdfa.ca.gov or mailed to the department at P.O. Box 942871, Sacramento, CA 94271.

The license type, pursuant to section 8201

If the applicant has already submitted an application for annual licensure, the application number

The legal business name of the applicant entity

The full legal name, mailing address, phone number, email address, and affiliation of the designated responsible party who shall:

(A) Be an owner with legal authority to bind the applicant entity;

(B) Serve as agent for service of process; and

(C) Serve as primary contact for the application

The physical address of the premises

A copy of a valid license, permit, or other authorization, issued by a local jurisdiction, that enables the applicant entity to conduct commercial cannabis activity at the location requested for the temporary license. For the purposes of this section, “other authorizations” shall include, at a minimum, a written statement or reference that clearly indicates the local jurisdiction intended to grant permission to the applicant entity to conduct commercial cannabis activity at the premises.

 

Annual Application Requirements (Must Be Filed 120 Days After Temp. Application)

Temporary license application (can be filed by hard copy or via www.bcc.ca.gov)

The legal business name of the applicant

The email address of the applicant’s business and the telephone number for the premises

The business’ federal employer identification number

A description of the business organizational structure of the applicant (partnership or corporation)

The temporary license type that is being requested

The license designation requested, A-license or M-license, (all license types other than laboratories)

The contact information for the applicant’s designated primary contact person

owner’s name, title, percentage of ownership, mailing address, telephone number, & email address

The physical address of the premises to be licensed

The mailing address for the applicant, if different from the premises address

The telephone number for the premises

The website address of the applicant’s business

Evidence that the applicant has the legal right to occupy and use the proposed location (section 5007)

A premises diagram

A copy of a valid license, permit, or other authorization issued by a local jurisdiction

Payment of an application fee (section 5014)

Whether the owner is serving or has previously served in the military. (Disclosure is voluntary)

A list of the license types and the license numbers issued from the Bureau and all other state cannabis licensing authorities that the applicant holds, including the date the license was issued and the licensing authority that issued the license.

Whether the applicant has been denied a license or has had a license suspended or revoked by the Bureau or any other state cannabis licensing authority. The applicant shall provide the type of license applied for, the name of the licensing authority that denied the application, and the date of denial.

The business-formation documents, which may include, but are not limited to, articles of incorporation, operating agreements, partnership agreements, and fictitious business name statements. The applicant shall also provide all documents filed with the California Secretary of State, which may include, but are not limited to, articles of incorporation, certificates of stock, articles of organization, certificates of limited partnership, and statements of partnership authority.

A list of every fictitious business name the applicant is operating under including the address where the business is located.

A list of funds belonging to the applicant held in savings, checking, or other accounts maintained by a financial institution. The applicant shall provide for each account, the financial

institution’s name, the financial institution’s address, account type, account number, and the

amount of money in the account.

A list of loans made to the applicant. For each loan, the applicant shall provide the amount of the loan, the date of the loan, term(s) of the loan, security provided for the loan, and the name, address, and phone number of the lender.

A list of investments made into the applicant’s commercial cannabis business. For each investment, the applicant shall provide the amount of the investment, the date of the investment, term(s) of the investment, and the name, address, and phone number of the investor.

A list of all gifts of any kind given to the applicant for its use in conducting commercial cannabis activity. For each gift, the applicant shall provide the value of the gift or description of the gift, and the name, address, and phone number of the provider of the gift.

A complete list of every individual that has a financial interest in the commercial cannabis business as defined in 5004 of this division, who is not an owner pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 26001(al).

A complete list of every owner of the applicant as defined in Business and Professions Code section 26001(al). Each individual named on this list shall submit the following information:

(A)

The full name of the owner.

(B)

The owner’s title within the applicant entity.

(C)

The owner’s date of birth and place of birth.

(D)

The owner’s social security number or individual taxpayer identification number.

(E)

The owner’s mailing address.

(F)

The owner’s telephone number. This may include a number for the owner’s home, business,

or mobile telephone.

(G)

The owner’s email address.

(H)

The owner’s current employer.

(I)

The percentage of the ownership interest held in the applicant entity by the owner.

(J)

Whether the owner has an ownership or a financial interest as defined in 5003 and 5004 of this division in any other commercial cannabis business licensed under the Act.

(K)

A copy of the owner’s government-issued identification. Acceptable forms of identification are a document issued by a federal, state, county, or municipal government that includes the name, date of birth, physical description, and picture of the person, such as a driver license.

(L)

A detailed description of the owner’s convictions. A conviction within the meaning of this section means a plea or verdict of guilty or a conviction following a plea of nolo contendere. Convictions dismissed under Penal Code section 1203.4 or equivalent non-California law must

be disclosed. Convictions dismissed under Health and Safety Code section 11361.8 or equivalent non-California law must be disclosed. Juvenile adjudications and traffic infractions under $300 that did not involve alcohol, dangerous drugs, or controlled substances do not need to be included. For each conviction, the owner shall provide the following:

(i)

The date of conviction.

(ii)

Dates of incarceration if applicable.

(iii) Dates of probation if applicable.

(iv)

Dates of parole if applicable.

(v)

A detailed description of the offense for which the owner was convicted.

(vi)

A statement of rehabilitation for each conviction. The statement of rehabilitation is to be written by the owner and may contain evidence that the owner would like the Bureau to consider that demonstrates the owner’s fitness for licensure. Supporting evidence may be attached to the statement of rehabilitation and may include, but is not limited to, a certificate of rehabilitation under Penal Code section 4852.01, dated letters of reference from employers, instructors, or professional counselors that contain valid contact information for the individual providing the reference.

(M)

If applicable, a detailed description of any suspension of a commercial cannabis license, revocation of a commercial cannabis license, or sanctions for unlicensed commercial cannabis activity by a licensing authority or local agency against the applicant or a business entity in which the applicant was an owner or officer within the three years immediately preceding the date of the application.

(N)

Attestation to the following statement: Under penalty of perjury, I hereby declare that the information contained within and submitted with the application is complete, true, and accurate. I understand that a misrepresentation of fact is cause for rejection of this application, denial of the license, or revocation of a license issued.

Evidence that the applicant has the legal right to occupy and use the proposed location that complies with section 5007 of this division.

Evidence that the proposed premises is in compliance with Business and Professions Code section 26054(b).

For an applicant with 20 or more employees, the applicant shall attest that the applicant has entered into a labor peace agreement and will abide by the terms of the agreement, and the applicant shall provide a copy of the agreement to the Bureau. For applicants who have not yet entered into a labor peace agreement, the applicant shall provide a notarized statement indicating the applicant will enter into and abide by the terms of a labor peace agreement.

The applicant shall provide a valid seller’s permit number issued by the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration, if applicable. If the applicant has not yet received a

seller’s permit, the applicant shall attest that the applicant is currently applying for a seller’s

permit.

Proof of a bond (section 5008)

(For testing laboratory applications), the certificate(s) of accreditation as required by section 5702 of this division, or the information required for a provisional license as required by section 5703 of this division.

All licensee applications shall include a detailed description of the applicant’s operating procedures including the following (if applicable):

(A)

The Transportation Procedures

(i)

A description of the applicant’s procedure for transportation of cannabis goods, including whether or not the applicant will be transporting cannabis goods or contracting for transportation services.

(B)

Inventory Procedures

(i)

A description of the applicant’s procedure for receiving shipments of inventory.

(ii)

Where the applicant’s inventory will be stored on the premises and how records of the inventory will be maintained.

(iii) The applicant’s procedure for performing inventory reconciliation and for ensuring that inventory records are accurate.

(C)

Non-Laboratory Quality Control Procedures

(i)

The applicant’s procedures for preventing the deterioration of cannabis goods held by the applicant.

(ii)

The applicant’s procedures for ensuring that cannabis goods are properly packaged and labeled prior to retail sale.

(iii) The applicant’s procedures for ensuring that a licensed testing laboratory samples and analyzes cannabis goods held by the applicant.

(D)

Security Procedures

(i)

The applicant’s procedure for allowing individuals access to the premises.

(ii)

A description of the applicant’s video surveillance system including camera placement and procedures for the maintenance of video surveillance equipment.

Bureau of Cannabis Control Emergency Regulation Text Page 8 of 115

(iii) How the applicant will ensure that all access points to the premises will be secured, including the use of security personnel.

(iv)

A description of the applicant’s security alarm system.

Evidence of exemption from, or compliance with, the California Environmental Quality Act as required by section 5010.

 

Cultivation Applications – Department Of Food And Agriculture

Nonrefundable application fees for the specified annual license type

(a) Specialty Cottage Outdoor $135

(b) Specialty Cottage Indoor $205

(c) Specialty Cottage Mixed-Light Tier 1 $340

(d) Specialty Cottage Mixed-Light Tier 2 $580

(e) Specialty Outdoor $270

(f) Specialty Indoor $2,170

(g) Specialty Mixed-Light Tier 1 $655

(h) Specialty Mixed-Light Tier 2 $1,125

(i) Small Outdoor $535

(j) Small Indoor $3,935

(k) Small Mixed-Light Tier 1 $1,310

(l) Small Mixed-Light Tier 2 $2,250

(m) Medium Outdoor $1,555

(n) Medium Indoor $8,655

(o) Medium Mixed-Light Tier 1 $2,885

(p) Medium Mixed-Light Tier 2 $4,945

(q) Nursery $520

(r) Processor $1,040

§ 8104. Legal Right to Occupy.

(a) If the applicant is the owner of the property on which the premises is located, the applicant shall provide to the department a copy of the title or deed to the property.

(b) If the applicant is not the owner of the property upon which the premises is located, the applicant shall provide the following to the department:

(1) A document from the property owner or property owner’s agent where the commercial cannabis activity will occur that states the applicant has the right to occupy the property and acknowledges that the applicant may use the property for commercial cannabis cultivation;

(2) The property owner’s mailing address and phone number; and

(3) A copy of the lease or rental agreement, or other contractual documentation.

§ 8105. Property Diagram.

A property diagram shall be submitted with each application and shall contain the following:

(a) Boundaries of the property and the proposed premises wherein the license privileges will be exercised with sufficient detail to enable ready determination of the bounds of the premises showing all perimeter dimensions, entrances, and exits to both the property and premises;

(b) If the proposed premises consists of only a portion of a property, the diagram shall be labeled indicating which part of the property is the proposed premises and what the remaining property is used for.

(c) All roads and water crossings on the property;

(d) If the applicant is proposing to use a diversion from a waterbody, groundwater well, or rain catchment system as a water source for cultivation, include the following locations on the property diagram with locations also provided as coordinates in either latitude and longitude or the California Coordinate System:

(1) Sources of water used, including the location of waterbody diversion(s), pump location(s), and distribution system; and

(2) Location, type, and capacity of each storage unit to be used for cultivation.

(e) The assessor’s parcel number(s);

(f) The diagram shall be to scale; and

(g) The diagram shall not contain any highlighting.

§ 8106. Cultivation Plan Requirements.

(a) The cultivation plan for Specialty Cottage, Specialty, Small and Medium licenses shall include all of the following:

(1) A detailed premises diagram showing all boundaries and dimensions in feet of the following proposed areas to scale:

(A) Canopy area(s) (which shall contain mature plants, at any point in time) including aggregate square footage;

(B) Area(s) outside of the canopy where only immature plants shall be maintained, if applicable;

(C) Designated pesticide and other agricultural chemical storage area(s); (D) Designated processing area(s) if the licensee will process on site;

(E) Designated packaging area(s) if the licensee will package products on site;

(F) Designated composting area(s) if the licensee will compost cannabis waste on site;

(G) Designated secured area(s) for cannabis waste if different than subsection (F) above;

(H) Designated area(s) for harvested cannabis storage; and

(2) For indoor and mixed-light license type applications, a lighting diagram with the following information shall be included:

(A) Location of all lights in the canopy area(s); and

(B) Maximum wattage, or wattage equivalent, of each light.

(3) A pest management plan which shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

(A) Product name and active ingredient(s) of all pesticides to be applied to cannabis during any stage of plant growth; and

(B) Integrated pest management protocols including chemical, biological and cultural methods the applicant anticipates using to control or prevent the introduction of pests on the cultivation site.

(4) A cannabis waste management plan meeting the requirements of section 8108 of this Chapter. (b) The cultivation plan for nursery licenses shall include the following information: (1) A detailed premises diagram showing all boundaries and dimensions, in feet, of the following proposed areas:

(A) Area(s) which shall contain only immature plants;

(B) Designated research and development area(s) which may contain mature plants;

(C) Designated seed production area(s) which may contain mature plants; (D) Designated pesticide and other agricultural chemical storage area(s);

(E) Designated composting area(s) if the licensee will compost cannabis waste on site; and

(F) Designated secured area(s) for cannabis waste if different than subsection (E) above.

(2) A pest management plan which shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

(A) Product name and active ingredient(s) of all pesticides to be applied to cannabis during any stage of plant growth; and

(B) Integrated pest management protocols including chemical, biological and cultural methods the applicant anticipates using to control or prevent the introduction of pests on the cultivation site.

(3) A cannabis waste management plan pursuant to section 8108 of this Chapter.

(c) The cultivation plan for processor licenses shall include a detailed premises diagram showing all boundaries and dimensions, in feet, of the following proposed areas:

(1) Designated processing area(s);

(2) Designated packaging area(s), if the licensee will package and label products on site;

(3) Designated composting area(s) if the licensee will compost cannabis waste on site;

(4) Designated secured area(s) for cannabis waste if different than subsection (3) above; and;

(5) Designated area(s) for harvested cannabis storage;

(6) A cannabis waste management plan pursuant to section 8108 of this Chapter.

§ 8107. Supplemental Water Source Information.

The following information shall be provided for each water source identified by the applicant:

(a) Retail water supply sources:

(1) If the water source is a retail supplier, such as a municipal provider, as defined in Section 13575 of Water Code, identify the retail water supplier.

(2) If the water source is a small retail supplier, such as a delivery service, and is subject to subdivisions (a)(1)(B) of Section 26060.1 of Business and Professions Code:

(A) And if the contract is for delivery or pickup of water from a surface water body or an underground stream flowing in a known and definite channel, provide all of the following:

(i) The name of the contract water supplier;

(ii) The geographic location coordinates in either latitude and longitude or the California Coordinate System of any point of diversion used by the contract water supplier to divert water delivered to the applicant under the contract;

(iii) The authorized place of use for any water right used by the contract water supplier to divert water delivered to the applicant under the contract; and

(iv) The maximum amount of water delivered to the applicant for cannabis cultivation in any year.

(B) And if the contract is for delivery or pickup of water from a groundwater well, provide all of the following:

(i) The name of the contract water supplier;

(ii) The geographic location coordinates for any groundwater well used to supply water delivered to the applicant, in either latitude and longitude or the California Coordinate System;

(iii) The maximum amount of water delivered to the applicant for cannabis cultivation in any year; and

(iv) A copy of the well log filed with the Department of Water Resources pursuant to Section 13751 of Water Code for each percolating groundwater well used to divert water delivered to the applicant. If no well log is available, the applicant shall provide evidence from the Department of Water Resources indicating that the Department does not have a record of the well log. When no well log is available, the State Water Resources Control Board may request additional information about the well. (b) If the water source is a groundwater well:

(1) The groundwater wells geographic location coordinates in either latitude and longitude or the California Coordinate System; and

(2) A copy of the well log filed with the Department of Water Resources pursuant to Section 13751 of Water Code. If no well log is available, the applicant shall provide evidence from the Department of Water Resources indicating that the Department of Water Resources does not have a record of the well log. If no well log is available, the State Water Resources Control Board may request additional information about the well.

(c) If the water source is a rainwater catchment system:

(1) The total square footage of the catchment footprint area(s);

(2) The total storage capacity, in gallons, of the catchment system(s); and

(3) A detailed description of the type, nature, and location of each catchment surface. Examples of catchment surfaces include a rooftop and greenhouse.

(d) If the water source is a diversion from a waterbody, provide any applicable statement, application, permit, license, or small irrigation use registration identification number(s); and either

(1) A copy of any applicable registrations, permits, or licenses or proof of a pending application, issued under Part 2 (commencing with Section 1200) of Division 2 of the California Water Code as evidence of approval of a water diversion by the State Water Resources Control Board;

(2) A copy of any statements of diversion and use filed with the State Water Resources Control Board before October 31, 2017 detailing the water diversion and use; or

(3) A copy of documentation submitted to the State Water Resources Control Board before October 31, 2017 demonstrating that the diversion is authorized under a riparian right and that no diversion occurred in any calendar year between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2017.

(4) If the applicant has claimed an exception from the requirement to file a statement of diversion and use, the applicant shall provide a copy of the documentation submitted to the State Water Resources Control Board before January 1, 2019 demonstrating that the diversion is subject to subdivision (a), (c), (d), or (e) of Section 5101 of Water Code. Authority: Sections 26012 and 26013, Business and Professions Code. Reference: Section 26060.1, Business and Professions Code; and Section 13149, Water Code.

§ 8109. Applicant Track and Trace Training Requirement.

(a) Each applicant is responsible for registering for state-mandated training, as prescribed by the department, within ten (10) business days of receiving notice from the department that their application for licensure has been received and is complete.

(b) Documentation of training completion shall be provided to the department within ten (10) business days of completion. Applicants approved for an annual license shall not have access to the track-and-trace system until the licensee’s designated account manager has completed, and provided proof of completion, of the track-and-trace training prescribed by the department. Authority: Sections 26012 and 26013, Business and Professions Code. Reference: Section 26067, Business and Professions Code.

§ 8110. Proof of Local License, Permit, or Other Authorization.

When the applicant provides a license, permit, or other authorization from the local jurisdiction where the licensed premises will be or is located, the department will notify the contact person identified pursuant to Section 26055 of Business and Professions Code. If the local jurisdiction does not respond to the department’s notification within ten (10) calendar days, the department may issue a license to the applicant. Authority: Sections 26012 and 26013, Business and Professions Code. Reference: Section 26050.1 and 26055, Business and Professions Code.

California Cannabis Industry

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